How cigarette smoking damages the heart and lungs

What Are Smoking and Smokeless Tobacco?

How cigarette smoking damages the heart and lungs

Cigarette smoking causes about 1 in every 5 deaths in the United States each year. It's the main preventable cause of death and illness in the United States. Smoking harms nearly every organ in the body, including the heart, blood vessels, lungs, eyes, mouth, reproductive organs, bones, bladder, and digestive organs.

Smoking Stinks!

This article focuses on how smoking affects the heart and blood vessels. They also can damage the function of your heart and the structure and function of your blood vessels.

This damage increases your risk of atherosclerosis.

How cigarette smoking damages the heart and lungs

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which a waxy substance called plaque builds up in the arteries. Over time, plaque hardens and narrows your arteries. This limits the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your organs and other parts of your body.

Coronary heart disease CHD occurs if plaque builds up in the coronary heart arteries. Over time, CHD can lead to chest painheart attackheart failurearrhythmiasor even death. Smoking is a major risk factor for heart disease. When combined with other risk factors—such as unhealthy blood cholesterol levelshigh blood pressureand overweight or obesity —smoking further raises the risk of heart disease.

Smoking also is a major risk factor for peripheral artery disease P. People who have P. Smoking and Atherosclerosis The image shows how smoking can affect arteries in the heart and legs.

Figure A shows the location of coronary heart disease and peripheral artery disease. Figure C shows a detailed view of a coronary heart artery with atherosclerosis. Any amount of smoking, even light smoking or occasional smoking, damages the heart and blood vessels.

For some people, such as women who use birth control pills and people who have diabetes, smoking poses an even greater risk to the heart and blood vessels.

Secondhand smoke also can harm the heart and blood vessels. Secondhand smoke is the smoke that comes from the burning end of a cigarette, cigar, or pipe.

Secondhand smoke also refers to smoke that's breathed out by a person who is smoking.

How cigarette smoking damages the heart and lungs

Secondhand smoke contains many of the same harmful chemicals that people inhale when they smoke. Secondhand smoke can damage the hearts and blood vessels of people who don't smoke in the same way that active smoking harms people who do smoke.

Secondhand smoke greatly increases adults' risk of heart attack and death. Secondhand smoke also raises children and teens' risk of future CHD because it: Lowers HDL cholesterol sometimes called "good" cholesterol Raises blood pressure Damages heart tissues The risks of secondhand smoke are especially high for premature babies who have respiratory distress syndrome RDS and children who have conditions such as asthma.

Researchers know less about how cigar and pipe smoke affects the heart and blood vessels than they do about cigarette smoke. However, the smoke from cigars and pipes contains the same harmful chemicals as the smoke from cigarettes.

Also, studies have shown that people who smoke cigars are at increased risk for heart disease. Benefits of Quitting Smoking and Avoiding Secondhand Smoke One of the best ways to reduce your risk of heart disease is to avoid tobacco smoke. Don't ever start smoking. If you already smoke, quit.

No matter how much or how long you've smoked, quitting will benefit you. Also, try to avoid secondhand smoke.Secondhand tobacco smoke contributes to about 34, premature heart disease deaths and 7, lung cancer deaths.

Studies show that the risk of developing heart disease is about percent higher among people exposed to environmental tobacco smoke at home or .

Most people are aware that smoking cigarettes is bad for your health. Since it's been linked to lung cancer, and later to heart disease and emphysema.

But the list doesn't stop there. Smoking harms nearly every organ in the body, including the heart, blood vessels, lungs, eyes, mouth, reproductive organs, bones, bladder, and digestive organs.

Asthma. Asthma is a lung condition that causes wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. It is caused by an inflammation of the lining of the airways in your lungs. The Benefits of a Smoke-Free Lifestyle If I Quit Smoking You may ask yourself, “What exactly happens if I quit smoking?” If you have even a glimmer of a thought that quitting smoking might not be worthwhile, especially after years of the habit, these live longer, healthier and wealthier benefits will surely change your mind. Smoking damages your heart and your blood circulation, increasing the risk of conditions such as coronary heart disease, heart attack, stroke, peripheral vascular disease (damaged blood vessels) and cerebrovascular disease (damaged arteries that supply blood to your brain).

This article focuses on how smoking affects the heart and blood vessels. Smoking damages nearly every organ in the body.

It is directly responsible for a range of diseases, including heart disease, respiratory disease, and lung cancer.

In fact, smoking accounts for Smoking damages the arteries to the heart and brain, thereby increasing the risk of heart attack and stroke.

(British Medical Journal , in Health Gazette newsletter, Feb. ) Cigarette smoking harms the body by raising cholesterol levels and blood pressure. Smokers are at greater risk for diseases that affect the heart and blood vessels (cardiovascular disease). 1,2 Smoking causes stroke and coronary heart disease, which are among the leading causes of death in the United States.

1,3 Even people who smoke fewer than five cigarettes a day can have early signs of cardiovascular disease.

1 Smoking damages .

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