The dying specie of the black rhinoceros

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The dying specie of the black rhinoceros

Humans and occasionally lions or hyenas Habitat Where do elephants live? They will live in almost any habitat that provides plentiful food and water.

Importance of Red Pandas by Freya Natasha on Prezi

Their populations are scattered throughout the savannas of sub-Saharan Africa. About 70 percent of their range exists in protected land.

The dying specie of the black rhinoceros

Physical Characteristics What are African savanna elephants? There are two recognized subspecies of African elephants: Savanna elephants are larger than forest elephants and their tusks curve out, while forest elephants are darker and have tusks that are straighter and that point downward.

Their trunk is a long nose that is used for breathing, smelling, drinking, trumpeting, and grabbing objects.

Their trunks are also a grooming tool.

Causes of Endangerment

Grooming consists of using their trunks to cover themselves with mud or water to maintain hydration. They have two fingerlike extensions on the tips of their trunks that are used for holding onto small objects.

They also use their trunks to exhibit affection, by frequently touching and caressing one another. They spend a lot of time eating. They can eat up to kilograms pounds of food and drink to liters 30 to 50 gallons of water in one day.

Much like humans, they are social creatures that live in small family groups that usually consist of an older matriarch and several generations of female relatives.

Males are typically solitary once matured but may live in small groups of three or four bulls. They take care of weak or injured members and even appear to grieve over dead companions. Gallery Challenges Humans are poaching elephants for their ivory tusks. The large tusks on either side of their face—used for foraging for food and water—have long been desired by people.

The ivory trade is driven by consumer demand for products made from elephant tusks and supplied by a sophisticated international network of traffickers. Poachers kill this iconic species for its ivory tusks, which are then sold and made into anything from jewelry and crafts to musical instruments to religious objects.

At current poaching rates, elephant populations may be extinct in the wild within our lifetimes. Elephants have slow rates of reproduction. They have longer pregnancies than almost any other mammal. They carry their calves for about 22 months, with cows usually bearing only one calf every three to six years.

Their regeneration rate averages 5 to 6 percent annually, compared to the 8 to 9 percent poaching rates, resulting in a net loss in population numbers.

Elephants are threatened with extinction as they are unable to sustain current population numbers if the high rate of poaching continues unabated.S Artificial Insemination in Farm Animals Based on the results of our survey (visiting the eleven farms).

The equipments and tools for artificial insemination (Photo: Kukovics. No other method (like reducing the length of light hours) was used on these farms. 1 and 10 (only in the case of Merinos).

Where do elephants live?

The jaguar's coat has different colors, but they are usually yellow-brownish with black spots, like leopards. Some jaguars are even white. The jaguar's coat on its side and back is spotted with large black rosettes, each consisting of a circle of spots surrounding a central spot.

The black rhinoceros or hook-lipped rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) is a species of rhinoceros, native to eastern and southern Africa including Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and regardbouddhiste.com: Diceros, Gray, Despite the worldwide increase of rhinoceros calf numbers, the growth of the population of white and black rhinoceros is slowing down mainly due to anthropogenic causes, such as poaching and.

The black rhinoceros or hook-lipped rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) is a species of rhinoceros, native to eastern and southern Africa including Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. 30 Interesting Facts About Endangered Species.

Endangered species are those species that are at a risk of becoming extinct due to man’s intervention for their fur, habitat loss, climate change, disease, regardbouddhiste.comered species have a small or declining population, meaning that there are so few left and could extinct anytime in near future.

Endangered Wildlife: Jaguar